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Mississippi Edition

Airs weekdays at 8:30 a.m. on MPB Think Radio

In a continued effort to provide relevant, interesting and engaging programming to our statewide audience, MPB Think Radio provides Mississippi Edition, a weekday news magazine program. Mississippi Edition, hosted by Kar
Latest Episode5/18/2021

5/18/20 - Medical Marijuana Advocates Respond | U.S. Supreme Court to Hear MS Abortion Ban | Bail Project

Advocates for medical marijuana continue to speak out after the Mississippi Supreme Court invalidated Initiative 65.We examine the health and economic fall out of the decision.Then, the United States' highest court agrees to hear Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban - setting the stage for the potential overturning of Roe v Wade.Plus, the Bail Project comes to Mississippi.Segment 1:Advocates for Mississippi's medical marijuana ballot initiative are expressing frustration following the Mississippi Supreme Court's opinion that effectively overturned the newly adopted constitutional amendment. Rankin County resident Angie Calhoun was a leading voice for Initiative 65 last fall.She said legalizing medical marijuana would have allowed her son to return home.Now, as she tells our Kobee Vance, she feels the life has been sucked out of her. Daniel Thompson says he's spent tens of thousands of dollars on land for farming and distribution - investments he believes the court has now undermined.Segment 2:Mississippi's 15 Week Abortion ban is drawing national attention, following the United States Supreme Court's decision to hear the case this fall.Pro-life champions are celebrating the move as they view it as an opportunity to challenge Roe v Wade. But advocates for reproductive rights find the situation more grim.Diane Derzis is the owner and CEO of Jackson Women's Health Organization - the only clinic in state that performs abortions.She tells our Desare Frazier, with current make-up of the court, Mississippi's 15-week ban is tailor-made to challenge the Roe opinion.Segment 3:Bail - the temporary release of an accused person awaiting trial on the condition of payment - is receiving elevated scrutiny as criminal justice reforms nationwide look to dismantle the discriminatory practice.And while some states have begun getting rid of their cash bail system, the gulf states have not. That's where The Bail Project hopes to help.It’s a national organization -- already running in Louisiana -- that helps bail people out of jail.Robin Sterling is the CEO and Founder of the Bail Project.She tells the Gulf States Newsroom’s Becca Schimmel the group is trying to reduce the number of people who are behind bars waiting for their day in court.
5/18/2021

5/18/20 - Medical Marijuana Advocates Respond | U.S. Supreme Court to Hear MS Abortion Ban | Bail Project

Advocates for medical marijuana continue to speak out after the Mississippi Supreme Court invalidated Initiative 65.We examine the health and economic fall out of the decision.Then, the United States' highest court agrees to hear Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban - setting the stage for the potential overturning of Roe v Wade.Plus, the Bail Project comes to Mississippi.Segment 1:Advocates for Mississippi's medical marijuana ballot initiative are expressing frustration following the Mississippi Supreme Court's opinion that effectively overturned the newly adopted constitutional amendment. Rankin County resident Angie Calhoun was a leading voice for Initiative 65 last fall.She said legalizing medical marijuana would have allowed her son to return home.Now, as she tells our Kobee Vance, she feels the life has been sucked out of her. Daniel Thompson says he's spent tens of thousands of dollars on land for farming and distribution - investments he believes the court has now undermined.Segment 2:Mississippi's 15 Week Abortion ban is drawing national attention, following the United States Supreme Court's decision to hear the case this fall.Pro-life champions are celebrating the move as they view it as an opportunity to challenge Roe v Wade. But advocates for reproductive rights find the situation more grim.Diane Derzis is the owner and CEO of Jackson Women's Health Organization - the only clinic in state that performs abortions.She tells our Desare Frazier, with current make-up of the court, Mississippi's 15-week ban is tailor-made to challenge the Roe opinion.Segment 3:Bail - the temporary release of an accused person awaiting trial on the condition of payment - is receiving elevated scrutiny as criminal justice reforms nationwide look to dismantle the discriminatory practice.And while some states have begun getting rid of their cash bail system, the gulf states have not. That's where The Bail Project hopes to help.It’s a national organization -- already running in Louisiana -- that helps bail people out of jail.Robin Sterling is the CEO and Founder of the Bail Project.She tells the Gulf States Newsroom’s Becca Schimmel the group is trying to reduce the number of people who are behind bars waiting for their day in court.
5/14/2021

5/14/21 - Adolescents Get Vaccinated | Freedom Rides, 60 Years Later | 1970 JSU Class Finally Walks

Mississippi’s first 12 to 15 year olds get the Pfizer shot after authorization from the CDC and FDA.Then, 60 years after the Freedom Rides, participants reflect on the meaning of their fight for civil rights.Plus, members of Jackson State’s 1970 graduating class get a ceremony - 51 years after the deadly shootings of Phillip Gibbs and James Green.Segment 1:Young teens in Mississippi are getting their first dose of the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine that was recently approved for use in the ages of 12-15.The new authorizations means more than 160 thousand adolescents in Mississippi can get vaccinated.At the University of Mississippi Medical Center, 14 year old Clinton resident Rosemary Williamson is getting her first dose of the coronavirus vaccine.With her mother Amy by her side, she tells our Kobee Vance why she decided to get her first dose on the first day.Segment 2:This month marks the 60th anniversary of the Freedom Rides, when young civil rights activists rode buses into the south, challenging segregation in busing and public facilities. As they made the journey from the nation’s capital to the Deep South, they were taunted and beaten by white mobs – and jailed. A few of the buses were even bombed. Janae Pierre, from our partner station WBHM, talked to participants of the movement about what their fight means decades later.Segment 3:James "Lap" Baker was supposed to ceremoniously receive his degree from Jackson State College in 1970.But on May 15th of that year,a police involved shooting brought the spring semester to an abrupt end and postponed graduation.Two African-American men were killed and at least a dozen other people were injured.Baker and over 70 of his classmates will march in their caps and gowns for the first time in a special ceremony at the Green-Gibbs Plaza on the campus of JSU.The site is named after the two young men killed by gunfire from the Mississippi Highway Patrol: Phillip Gibbs,a 21 year-old junior pre-law major and married father of an 18-month-old son and a second unborn child; and James Earl Green, 17, a senior at Jim Hill High School, who was killed while observing the chaos. Baker, an eyewitness, remembers crawling through the grass to get to safety that night.He tells our Ashley Norwood the incident forever changed him.The ceremony for the 1970 class also includes the awarding of honorary doctorates to the late Phillip Gibbs and James Green.Nerene Wray, Phillip Gibbs' sister, will be at the site named after her brother to receive the posthumous honor.She says she appreciates that university and the community still remember Phillip.
5/13/2021

5/13/21 - New Adolescent Group Now Vaccine-eligible | Hesitancy in Rural MS | ACA Special Enrollment

A leading pediatrician responds to the approval of the Pfizer vaccine for 12 to 15 year olds.Then, with vaccination rates declining statewide, we examine hesitancy in a rural, majority white community.Plus, we hear from the U.S. Assistant Secretary of Health on the special enrollment period for health coverage though the ACA marketplace.Segment 1:Parents in Mississippi can begin scheduling a coronavirus vaccination for children age 12 to 15.The Pfizer coronavirus vaccine has received emergency use authorization from the FDA, and has now gained approval by the CDC for use in the adolescent age group.The decision comes at a time of declining vaccination rates in Mississippi.Health officials say around a quarter of the state's nearly three million residents are under the age of 16.Dr. Anita Henderson is President of the Mississippi Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She tells our Kobee Vance the authorization means clinics and hospitals already offering the Pfizer shot can begin vaccinating eligible children now.Segment 2:Mississippi, along with Louisiana and Alabama, have the lowest coronavirus vaccination rates in the country. That’s according to data from the Kaiser Family Foundation. Gulf States Newsroom health reporter Shalina Chatlani has been following this story and traveled to North Mississippi to ask people why they were against the shot. She’s joining me today to talk about some of those conversations.Segment 3:The White House is celebrating a public health milestone this week.New enrollment for health coverage during a special period made possible through President Biden's American Rescue Plan has topped one million Americans.The legislation also lowered premiums for nine million Americans who buy their coverage through the Affordable Care Act, and also reduced deductibles by nearly 90 percent.Dr. Rachel Levine is the U.S. Assistant Secretary of Health.She tells our Michael Guidry the special enrollment period is one step in the administration's goal of making health care a right - not a privilege.